Delay the Start of Resource Work on a Task

//Delay the Start of Resource Work on a Task

Delay the Start of Resource Work on a Task

A Problem and a Solution

Several months ago, there was an interesting question in the Project Standard and Professional user forum on the Internet. The user who posted the question had the following situation in his Microsoft Project schedule:

  • He needs to assign two resources to a task.
  • Each resource will work full-time for 80 hours.
  • The second resource will not start work on the task until the first resource is finished.

The third bullet point describes the challenge. How do you delay the start of the second resource so that the resource does not start work on the task until after the first resource is finished? My answer to this user’s question will reveal a feature of the Task Form view of which you may not be aware.

The solution to this user’s situation is as follows:

  1. Apply the Gantt Chart view and then select the task in question.
  2. Right-click anywhere in the white or gray part of the Gantt Chart pane and then select the Show Split item on the shortcut menu. Microsoft Project displays the Task Entry combination view, with the Gantt Chart view in the top pane and the Task Form view in the bottom pane, such as shown in Figure 1.
Figure 1: Task Entry view

Figure 1: Task Entry view

  1. In the Task Form pane, select the names of the two resources, enter a Units value of 100% for each resource, and enter 80h in the Work column for each resource. Click the OK button to assign the resources. Microsoft Project will calculate a Duration value of 10d for the task, such as shown in Figure 2.
Figure 2: Resources assigned

Figure 2: Both resources assigned to the task

  1. Right-click anywhere in the Task Form pane to display the shortcut menu shown in Figure 3 and then select the Schedule item on the shortcut menu. Microsoft Project displays the Schedule set of details in the Task Form pane.
Figure 3: Right-click in the Task Form pane

Figure 3: Right-click in the Task Form pane

  1. In the Task Form pane, enter 10d in the Delay column for the second resource, such as shown in Figure 4, and then click the OK button. Microsoft Project recalculates the Duration of the task as 20d because the assigned resources are working consecutively, each for 10 days.
Figure 4: Enter 10d in the Delay column

Figure 4: Enter 10d in the Delay column

  1. Right-click anywhere in the Task Form pane and select the Resources & Predecessors item on the shortcut menu.

To confirm that Microsoft Project correctly scheduled the resources on this task, Figure 5 shows the Task Usage view, zoomed to the Weeks level of detail. Notice that Gary Hayward is working 40 hours each week during the first two weeks of the task, while Quinlyn Baker is working 40 hours each week during the last two weeks of the task.

Figure 5: Task Usage view confirms the task schedule

Figure 5: Task Usage view confirms the task schedule

Note: To learn more about the different sets of details available in the Task Form view, refer to my previous blog post article, Applying Details to the Task Form View.

By |2020-09-10T12:54:39+00:00September 10th, 2020|Microsoft Project Tips|
Dale Howard, Microsoft Project MVP
Dale Howard is the Director of Education for PROJILITY. He has used Microsoft Project since version 4.0 for Windows 95 and he has used the Microsoft PPM tool since the first version of released as Project Central in the year 2000. He is the co-author of 23 books on Microsoft Project, Project Server, and Project Online. He is currently one of only 26 Microsoft Project MVPs in the entire world and one of only 4 in the United States.

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